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Scientists Believe Prehistoric Cave Paintings 'Were Not Created By Humans'

History’s first artists were NOT Neanderthals

 on 24th February 2018 @ 11.09am
 team found discovered ancient allegedly neanderthal crafted artwork in three different caves © press
team found discovered ancient allegedly-Neanderthal-crafted artwork in three different caves

Scientists have now discovered the world first prehistoric cave paintings were created by Neanderthals (not humans) according to a jaw-dropping research study published on Thursday.

A UK-German team found discovered ancient allegedly-Neanderthal-crafted artwork in three different caves in Spain according to the Guardian.

The researcher said that after studying the calcite crusts (organic matter that formed over the petrographs), the paintings were not created by humans as it dates back to at least 20,000 years before human evolution.

The daily caller reports: The researchers maintain this assertion after studying the calcite crusts (organic matter that formed over the petrographs), according to their research featured in Science magazine. The team’s uranium-series dating (or U-Th) availed the calcite crusts date back to at least 20,000 years before human evolution.

One La Pasiega-cave petrograph depicts a ladder-esque design in northern Spain at least 64,800 years old. The painting also has vague animal shapes, which humans might’ve added later was possibly added later.

Another Maltravieso-cave (western Spain) petrograph shaped like a hand dates back at least 66,700 years. The Ardales cave (near Malaga) features an abstract depiction of curtains from at least 65,500 years ago.

“It’s fascinating to demonstrate that the Neanderthals were the world’s first artists and not our own species,” Durham University Paleolithic Archaeology professor Paul Pettit said.

“I think we have the smoking gun,” University of Southampton archaeological sciences professor Alistair Pike said. Pike recalled the team being dumbfounded when receiving the initial U-Th date. The Neanderthal-art concept was a heavily debated topic prior to this discovery. However, research also entailed radiocarbon measurements, which has the potential for inaccurate results, according to the Independent.

Neanderthals were living in modern-day Europe until at least 120,000 years ago. (Humans arrived in Europe approximately 40,000 years ago.)

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