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Jan 6 Prisoner Denied 'Life-Saving' Cancer Treatment Now in 'Dire Straits'

Chris Worrell was arrested and charged with alleged offenses

 on 14th June 2022 @ 6.00pm
worrell is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds © press
Worrell is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds,

A Jan. 6 prisoner who was released by a federal judge after being denied cancer treatment is now “in dire straights,” according to his partner.

Chris Worrell was arrested and charged with alleged offenses related to his presence at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

Worrell is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds, engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct in a restricted building, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

According to the statement of facts (pdf), the FBI received a tip alleging that Worrell had participated in the breach at the Capitol, but there is no evidence that Worrell entered the Capitol building.

The statement includes photos of Worrell spraying pepper gel while standing in a crowd outside the Capitol, with police nearby.

An arrest warrant was issued for Worrell on March 10, 2021, charging him with the aforementioned alleged offenses, as well as charges for allegedly engaging in acts of physical violence in a restricted building or grounds and obstruction of Congress. 

priller shared her story of what happened on jan  6  2021  and the disturbing events that have transpired over the subsequent 17 months © press
Priller shared her story of what happened on Jan. 6, 2021, and the disturbing events that have transpired over the subsequent 17 months

As The Epoch Times reprots:

Worrell’s girlfriend, Trish Priller, was also in Washington that day. In an exclusive interview with The Epoch Times, Priller shared her story of what happened on Jan. 6, 2021, and the disturbing events that have transpired over the subsequent 17 months.

“We were just there,” Priller insisted.

“We were there with family members and friends. We had some ladies in their 70s that were with us.

The ladies wanted to go down and hear President Trump speak at the ellipse and I had never been to anything like that so I went with them.”

As Priller explained, there was a large crowd there that day and once you were in a spot at the ellipse, you could not move out of it—even to go to the restroom—because you would never find your people again or be allowed back in through the crowd. They stood there for several hours, waiting to hear President Donald Trump speak.

“I was at the ellipse with Chris and we were separated for seven and a half hours because the crowd was so enormous we couldn’t meet up with each other,” Priller recalled, adding that while the cell towers weren’t working and they couldn’t communicate by phone, they could get the occasional text “here and there.”

“I don’t know what he did during that time because we weren’t in the same area,” she said.

Two months later, on March 11, Worrell and some of his friends headed off for a weekend canoeing trip in northern Florida.

It was a Friday, and Priller was home alone when the FBI raided the house.

“They flash banged me and held me at gunpoint,” Priller recalled.

“When I went outside I had all of the lasers on me.

"They held me in my home for seven and a half hours.

"During that time they were rifling through everything in the house and I had to sit in a chair and watch them.

"I couldn’t go anywhere.

"If I wanted something to drink, they would bring it to me.

"When I had to go to the restroom I had to go with two agents with me into the bathroom.

"I was held prisoner in my home for all that time.”

worrell has a rare form of non hodgkin lymphoma  a type of blood cancer © press
Worrell has a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a type of blood cancer,

Five hours into the ordeal, Priller said she was allowed to call Worrell and give the phone to the FBI.

The agents agreed that Worrell could come home.

During the 3-hour drive back home, Worrell checked in about every 30 minutes to let the FBI know where he was, Priller said.

When Worrell arrived, he was immediately handcuffed, searched, and brought into the house.

Documents show Worrell was taken to Fort Meyers, Florida.

He was originally granted pretrial release on bond, but a second judge ordered a stay on Worrell’s release, and Worrell was instead transferred to Charlotte County, Florida, where he was held for three weeks.

Worrell has a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a type of blood cancer, and had been managing the illness since he was diagnosed in 2007.

He remained at stage one of the illness for several years.

But Priller said that when Worrell was being held in Charlotte County, he didn’t have access to his medications during that time.

“They wouldn’t allow the doctor to bring them in,” Priller asserted.

“They said I should go get them, but you can’t do that.

"You can’t bring medicines into a prison.

"They won’t let you do that.

"So our doctor wrote a prescription and sent it to them and they didn’t process it.

"It took almost the whole three weeks. At that point he was transferred to Oklahoma by Con-Air, I guess, where he stayed for another couple of days, still with no meds.”

As Priller explained, Worrell was then transferred to Northern Neck, Virginia, where he stayed for another couple of days.

It was there that Worrell contracted COVID-19.

At the time, it was already known the facility had many COVID cases.

Then he was transported to the Correctional Treatment Facility in Washington, referred to by Priller and many Jan. 6 prisoners as “the gulag.”

At that point, Worrell had gone 75 days without his medications.

“They basically said his physician wasn’t qualified, even though he had been in the practice and treated cancer patients,” Priller charged.

“They didn’t feel like he was qualified so he continued on with no meds.

"They would send him to doctors for visits but they falsified that.”

As Priller explained, Worrell would be taken from the prison and taken to the university hospital where he would see a doctor.

The guards who went with him had paperwork they needed to have filled out, so the doctor would fill out the paperwork and hand it to the guards to return it to the prison where it was given to their medical team, she said.

“The notes from the doctor were then transcribed by jail personnel, who fabricated things, changed notes switched it up and then gave it to the medical facility in the jail,” Priller asserted.

“They kept using the word ‘treatment.’

"But the word ‘treatment’ means you’re actually receiving some sort of medicine.

"He didn’t have any ‘treatment.’

"He had a consultation, not a ‘treatment’ for his cancer.”

Priller said Worrell Chris filed hundreds of grievances through the jail, not just for the lack of medical care for his cancer and broken hand but for the deplorable conditions he and other Jan. 6 prisoners were forced to live under.

“They told him if he keeps putting in grievances they were going to put him in the hole,” Priller said.

“And they did. They kept him there for 16 days.”

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tags: Jan 6 | Cancer
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