Neon Nettle
© 2022 Neon Nettle

Subscribe to our mailing list

Advertise Contact About Us Our Writers T&C's Privacy Support Us © 2022 Neon Nettle All Rights Reserved.

41% of Americans Say They’re Financially Worse off than a Year Ago, Poll Says

The figures are well below people's financial optimism of last year

 on 10th February 2022 @ 5.00pm
 forty one percent of u s  adults now say they are better off financially than a year ago © press
'Forty-one percent of U.S. adults now say they are better off financially than a year ago'

41% of Americans say they are financially worse off today than one year ago, while 41% say they are financially better off, according to a new poll.

The figures are well below people's financial optimism in January 2020 before the pandemic.

Gallup, on its Jan. 3-16 survey, reported:

“Forty-one percent of U.S. adults now say they are better off financially than a year ago.”

“That is up slightly from 35% in January 2021 but still well below the record-high 59% reporting they were better off in January 2020, right before the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

“An identical 41% of adults now say they are financially worse off than a year ago, also up from 36% in 2021.”

 an identical 41  of adults now say they are financially worse off than a year ago  also up from 36  in 2021 © press
'An identical 41% of adults now say they are financially worse off than a year ago, also up from 36% in 2021

60% of Americans said they will be financially better off than now, looking ahead to next year.

Twenty-seven percent said they would be worse off.

However, “[t]he percentage of Americans who foresee improvement in their finances has dipped (although not significantly) from last year’s 63%,” reported Gallup.

“Again, inflation could be a factor behind this sentiment stagnating....”

“Both the current and 2021 readings contrast with the all-time high for financial optimism,” said the survey firm.

“That was recorded just before the pandemic, in January 2020, when 74% expected to be better off in a year’s time.”

for those earning  40 000 or less per year  47  said they were better off  and 41  said they are worse off © press
For those earning $40,000 or less per year, 47% said they were better off, and 41% said they are worse off

Gallup asked certain annual income groups:

“Would you say that you are financially better off now than you were a year ago, or are you financially worse off now?

For those earning $40,000 or less per year, 47% said they were better off, and 41% said they are worse off.

For those earning $40,000 to $99,999 a year, 0nly 33% said they were better off than last year; 47% said they were worse off.

“Americans are not feeling as flush financially as they were in January 2020 when public confidence in the economy was at a 20-year high, unemployment was at a 50-year low, and the stock market was soaring,” said Gallup.

“After tumbling in the initial months of the pandemic, people’s belief that they are better off financially than a year ago has only inched forward.”

“Lower-income Americans today perceive real improvement in their finances after their assessment plunged a year ago,” reported Gallup.

“These Americans may have been the most affected by the economic shutdowns in 2020 and the resulting spike in unemployment, whereas jobs are now plentiful. Middle- and upper-income Americans have grown less positive over the past year, perhaps because they are more focused on inflation.

As Breitbart reported:

U.S. consumer prices jumped by the most in nearly four decades as the new year started, sapping the savings of American families, diminishing the purchasing power of worker paychecks, and putting pressure on the Federal Reserve to hike interest rates beginning in March.

The consumer price index climbed 0.6 percent from a month before, the Department of Labor said Thursday. Compared with January of last year, consumer prices are up 7.5 percent.

Economists had expected prices to rise 0.4 percent on a monthly basis and 7.2 percent above a year ago’s prices.

[READ MORE] Joe Rogan Rejects $100 Million Rumble Deal: 'Spotify Has Hung in with Me'

Share:
tags: economy | Joe Biden
Steve Quayle Neon Nettle telegram

Facebook is heavily censoring information from independent sources.

To bypass internet censorship, connect with us directly by enabling our notifications (using the red subscription bell in the bottom right corner) or by subscribing to our free daily newsletter.

Get the latest news delivered straight to your inbox for free every day by signing up below.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Subscribe to our mailing list

Follow Neon Nettle


PREV
BOOKMARK US
NEXT