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Democrat Caucuses Drop 'Under God' From Pledge of Allegiance at DNC Convention

Democratic National Convention sees Dems omit reference to God

 on 20th August 2020 @ 3.00pm
dnc caucuses dropped  under god  while reciting the pledge of allegiance © press
DNC caucuses dropped 'under God' while reciting the Pledge of Allegiance

Democrat caucuses dropped the phrase "under God" while reciting the Pledge of Allegiance during the DNC's Democratic National Convention meetings this week.

At least two DNC caucuses were found to have omitted the reference to God, according to reports.

CBN News's Chief Political Analyst David Brody tweeted out two videos where “under God” was cut from the Pledge of Allegiance, The Washington Times reported.

Among those to omit the line was Delegate A.J. Durrani while speaking at the DNC’s “Muslim Delegates and Allies Assembly.”

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands," Durrani said.

"One nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

delegate a j  durrani dropped  under god  while speaking at the dnc   s  muslim delegates and allies assembly © press
Delegate A.J. Durrani dropped 'under God' while speaking at the DNC’s 'Muslim Delegates and Allies Assembly'

WATCH:

Another Democrat speaker also dropped the phrase.

While waving a gay pride flag, the DNC LGBTQ Caucus stated: “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands.

"One nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

WATCH:

The Democrats' editing of the PoA makes their recital incomplete and incorrect, however, as changes to the Pledge can only be made with consent from the president.

The Pledge of Allegiance should read:

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

the dnc lgbtq speaker also cut the  under god  line from the pledge of allegiance © press
The DNC LGBTQ speaker also cut the 'under God' line from the Pledge of Allegiance

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs highlighted the history of the Pledge of Allegiance:

Thirty-one words which affirm the values and freedom that the American flag represents are recited while facing the flag as a pledge of Americans’ loyalty to their country.
The Pledge of Allegiance was written for the 400th anniversary, in 1892, of the discovery of America.
A national committee of educators and civic leaders planned a public-school celebration of Columbus Day to center around the flag.
Included with the script for ceremonies that would culminate in raising of the flag was the pledge.
So it was in October 1892 Columbus Day programs that school children across the country first recited the Pledge of Allegiance this way: 
"I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the Republic for which it stands: one Nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all."
Controversy continues over whether the author was the chairman of the committee, Francis Bellamy — who worked on a magazine for young people that published the pledge — or James Upham, who worked for the publishing firm that produced the magazine.
The pledge was published anonymously in the magazine and was not copyrighted.
According to some accounts of Bellamy as author, he decided to write a pledge of allegiance, rather than a salute, because it was a stronger expression of loyalty — something particularly significant even 27 years after the Civil War ended.
“One Nation indivisible” referred to the outcome of the Civil War, and “Liberty and Justice for all” expressed the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.
The words “my flag” were replaced by “the flag of the United States” in 1923, because some foreign-born people might have in mind the flag of the country of their birth, instead of the U.S. flag.
A year later, “of America” was added after “United States.”
No form of the pledge received official recognition by Congress until June 22, 1942, when it was formally included in the U.S. Flag Code.
The official name of The Pledge of Allegiance was adopted in 1945. The last change in language came on Flag Day 1954, when Congress passed a law which added the words “under God” after “one nation.”
Originally, the pledge was said with the hand in the so-called “Bellamy Salute,” with the hand resting first outward from the chest, then the arm extending out from the body.
Once Hitler came to power in Europe, some Americans were concerned that this position of the arm and hand resembled the salute rendered by the Nazi military.
In 1942, Congress established the current practice of rendering the pledge with the right hand placed flat over the heart.
Section 7 of the Federal Flag Code states that when not in military uniform, men should remove any headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, thereby resting the hand over the heart.
People in military uniform should remain silent, face the flag and render the military salute.
The Flag Code specifies that any future changes to the pledge would have to be with the consent of the president.
The Pledge of Allegiance now reads:
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

[RELATED] Vatican Drops Word 'God' from COVID Documents to Reach 'Widest Possible Audience'

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tags: God | Democrats

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