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Homeowners In California Slapped with $20K Bill to Clean Up Homeless Camp

Number of homeless people in the Californian capital rose by 19 percent over 2 years

 on 27th January 2020 @ 9.00pm
government notified the residents they would be responsible for the cleanup charges © press
Government notified the residents they would be responsible for the cleanup charges

Northern California homeowners have been hit with a bill to clean up a homeless camp after Alameda County announced that the trash had crossed onto their property lines.  

Walsh Property Management, which oversees the homeowners association, was forced to charge each homeowner in the association $300 in order to clean up trash and waste from a former homeless camp.

In October 2017, the camp was reported to Alameda County.

After the government cleared out the encampment, it notified the residents they would be responsible for the cleanup charges because part of the camp was on Walsh’s property line.

Owner of Walsh Property Management, Ed Walsh, told KPIX.

“There are no fences, and such that would mark where the property line ended, so we were kind of hoping that it was someone else’s responsibility."

the state has an estimated 130 000 people sleeping rough on the streets © press
The state has an estimated 130,000 people sleeping rough on the streets

“Unfortunately, this one happened to be on the association’s property."

One homeowner in the association, Cece Adam, said that either the county or the homeowners association should be responsible for the cleanup, arguing the association should have known the property lines, and the county should have notified the property of the problem before it got worse.

“They should have known that this was our property, and they should have taken care of it a long time ago,” Adams said.

Recent figures revealed that the number of homeless people in the Californian capital rose by 19 percent in the last two years.

The state has an estimated 130,000 people sleeping rough on the streets.

homelessness in the u s  increased by 2 7  in the last year with california as the driving force © press
Homelessness in the U.S. increased by 2.7% in the last year with California as the driving force.

And while the problems are well-documented in downtown Los Angeles - where Skid Row is a symbol of the national crisis - or San Francisco - where nearly one person in every hundred lives on the streets - it's Sacramento where the problem is rising the fastest.

A report by the Department of Housing and Urban Development last year revealed that the increase in homelessness in California in 2019 was higher than all other states combined.

Homelessness in the U.S. increased by 2.7% in the last year with California as the driving force.

But despite the Golden State increase, the majority of other states saw homelessness decreasing.

HUD said in the report:

"While the rest of the country experienced a combined decrease in homelessness in 2019, significant increases in unsheltered and chronic homelessness on the West Coast, particularly California and Oregon, offset those nationwide decreases, causing an overall increase in homelessness of 2.7 percent in 2019."

[RELATED] Homelessness Surges in Sacramento as California Homeless Crisis Continues to Spiral

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